Recognize depression in teens

It is commonly observed that people use terms like depressed and sad synonymously whereas they actually are something very different. In school, we’re taught the difference between weather and climate i.e., the weather is the short term changes in the atmosphere whereas climate is the long term change. Similarly, sadness is a short duration of feeling unhappy and upset but depression is a longer duration of it along with various other factors. It is very difficult to recognize depression in teens as it is often misinterpreted as being moody or just a tantrum. It is always tough to get through the transition from a teen to an adolescent and not being given the right kind of help can only make things worse.

The definition of depression varies from person to person but the basic definition is this: Depression is a dysfunction of the brain in such a way that it severely affects emotions (or moods). It is a mood disorder characterized by intense and persistent negative emotions. These emotions negatively impact people’s lives, causing social, educational, personal and family difficulties. It is not something that can be “snapped out” of nor can it be better by taking medication. Depression occurs either genetically or after a long phase of various problems and issues that overwhelm the individual and render them feeling helpless. It can only be cured with constant love, understanding and providing a safe environment.

Let me list out a few symptoms and the kinds of thoughts that are common during depression.

Symptoms:

Irritability, withdrawal from social gatherings, weight changes, immense sadness and a feeling of hopelessness and worthlessness, self-hate, misanthropic behavior, suicidal tendencies, self-harm, fatigue, lack of motivation, sleeping issues, feeling of nothingness, obsession with darkness and death, poor concentration and inability to finish any task.

Thoughts:
  1. I’m a waste of air and space.
  2. I don’t deserve anything good.
  3. Everything bad will happen to me.
  4. There’s no point in living.
  5. I should just end it already.

As you can see, sadness and depression are very different. Depression is a silent killer that seeps in and most people fail to understand it. It’s not easy to get out of depression unless you want to get better. Let’s see a few ways to handle it better.

  1. Talk to a therapist because not everyone understands depression so they can end up hurting you more.
  2. Make a list of things you’re unhappy with in your life and from the easiest to the most difficult, work towards changing it all.
  3. Work towards loving yourself and accepting yourself for who you are.
  4. Cognitive behavioral therapy works wonders for many people.
  5. Try recognizing and avoiding your triggers initially till you’re stronger.

The people who haven’t gone through depression just cannot understand the ones going through it as rationality comes in of no use in depression. If you’re surrounded by people who don’t understand you, you’re likely to feel more suffocated and angry. So for the parents, please be more considerate towards your child and I would urge the children to ask for help. Depression can be fought back if we know how to 🙂 All the best ❤

Image Source: valuinglife.org.nz, theodysseyonline, clipartkid, stat

One thought on “Recognize depression in teens

  1. sphericalinsight says:

    Thankyou for writing this and spreading the message. Most people only think about the physical health and none thinks about the mind and all of this begins as a kid and slowly with each passing day things get accumulated turning into a deep rooted virus that can’t be removed.

    So thanks again for spreading the word on this

    Like

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