10 movies to watch these holidays!

2015-summer-movie-promo

Hello, kids! If you’re anything like my little cousins, you’d probably be reading this while you wait for your fortress on Clash Royale to get upgraded. Isn’t that wait treacherous? So meanwhile what do you do? Youtube? Television?

We often switch on TV to watch Pokemon but when it’s not the time for it, we don’t know what to watch. So we get bored up to the point that we don’t even know what we’re watching. Don’t you worry, your boring times are over. Here is a list of movies you can watch that will not just improve your vocabulary, but also serve as great story-tellers that you can spend time with before you get back to Clash Royale or pick up your cricket bat and head to the street.

Dead Poets Society

The movie circulates around a new English teacher, John Keating (Robin Williams), who is introduced to an all-boys preparatory school that is known for its ancient traditions and high standards. He uses unorthodox methods to reach out to his students, who face enormous pressures from their parents and the school. With Keating’s help, students Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke) and others learn to break out of their shells, pursue their dreams and seize the day.

The Secret World of Arrietty

Arrietty (Bridgit Mendler), a tiny teenager, lives with her parents (Amy Poehler, Will Arnett) in the recesses of a suburban home, unbeknown to the homeowner and housekeeper. Like others of her kind, Arrietty remains hidden from her human hosts but occasionally ventures forth from beneath the floorboards to borrow sugar cubes and other supplies. A secret friendship forms when 12-year-old Shawn (David Henrie) meets Arrietty, but their relationship could spell danger for Arrietty’s family.

The Book Thief

In 1938, young orphan Liesel (Sophie Nélisse) arrives at the home of her new foster parents, Hans (Geoffrey Rush) and Rosa (Emily Watson). When Hans, a kindly housepainter, learns that Liesel cannot read, he teaches the child the wonders of the written language. Liesel grows to love books, even rescuing one from a Nazi bonfire. Though Liesel’s new family barely scrape by, their situation becomes even more precarious when they secretly shelter a Jewish boy whose father once saved Hans’ life.

Howl’s Moving Castle

Sophie (Emily Mortimer) has an uneventful life at her late father’s hat shop, but all that changes when she befriends wizard Howl (Christian Bale), who lives in a magical flying castle. However, the evil Witch of Waste (Lauren Bacall) takes issue with their budding relationship and casts a spell on young Sophie, which ages her prematurely. Now Howl must use all his magical talents to battle the jealous hag and return Sophie to her former youth and beauty.

Moana

An adventurous teenager sails out on a daring mission to save her people. During her journey, Moana meets the once-mighty demigod Maui, who guides her in her quest to become a master way-finder. Together they sail across the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous monsters and impossible odds. Along the way, Moana fulfills the ancient quest of her ancestors and discovers the one thing she always sought: her own identity.

Hugo

Orphaned and alone except for an uncle, Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) lives in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. Hugo’s job is to oil and maintains the station’s clocks, but to him, his more important task is to protect a broken automaton and notebook left to him by his late father (Jude Law). Accompanied by the goddaughter (Chloë Grace Moretz) of an embittered toy merchant (Ben Kingsley), Hugo embarks on a quest to solve the mystery of the automaton and find a place he can call home.

Stanley Ka Dabba

Stanley studies in an all-boys Holy Family High School in Andheri East, Mumbai. While his classmates bring their very own Tiffin-boxes, Stanley does not do so on the pretext that his mother is away, and shares food with Aman Mehra and others much to the chagrin of the Hindi Teacher, Babubhai Verma, who not only cajoles fellow-teachers but virtually forces children, to share their food with him. With extra classes being imposed on both students and teachers, and the recess breaks being doubled, parents are also forced to pack more food in lunchboxes. When students evade Babubhai and continue sharing food with Stanley, he calls the latter aside and warns him that he cannot attend school until and unless he brings his own food. Watch what impact this has on Stanley, teachers, and his classmates.

The Red Balloon

A boy makes friends with a seemingly sentient balloon, and it begins to follow him. It follows the boy to school, to the bus, and to church. Boy and balloon play together in the streets of Paris and try to elude a gang of boys that wants to destroy the balloon.

Trolls

After the Bergens invade Troll Village, Poppy (Anna Kendrick), the happiest Troll ever born, and the overly-cautious, curmudgeonly Branch (Justin Timberlake) set off on a journey to rescue her friends. Their mission is full of adventure and mishaps, as this mismatched duo try to tolerate each other long enough to get the job done.

Wall-E

WALL-E, short for Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-class, is the last robot left on Earth. He spends his days tidying up the planet, one piece of garbage at a time. But during 700 years, WALL-E has developed a personality, and he’s more than a little lonely. Then he spots EVE (Elissa Knight), a sleek and shapely probe sent back to Earth on a scanning mission. Smitten WALL-E embarks on his greatest adventure yet when he follows EVE across the galaxy.
 So these 10 movies should keep you pretty content with some nice stories and morals that they portray, make sure you watch them all with subtitles and if you come across any word you don’t know- pick up your tab and google it. There are other good movies besides Baahubali, children 😉